Author: RM Gallery

Thoughts on Secrecy

// Opening Wednesday 19 July 2017, 6pm

// 20 July – 12 August 2017

 

An exhibition of new work resulting from a conversation between Ruth Ige and Ammon Ngakuru.

Ruth Ige deals with the black body in relation to space, place, presence and belonging. She is interested in creating spaces within her work where people of colour are the protagonists of imagined stories and places. Spaces where reality meets fiction and gives way to reflection and empowerment. At the same time she explores the complexities of a person of colours navigation of familiar and unfamiliar spaces.

Ammon Ngakuru considers ideas of distance, place and (un)belonging, he often utilises personal and public archival information as a guide in the production of installation based works.… Continue

Bella and Theo IDEATE!

// Opening Wednesday 21 June 2017, 6pm

// 22 June – 15 July 2017

In 2016, Bella and Theo attended an entrepreneurial seminar to try and
acquire a little bit of funding to start a gallery. Though they left
without any cash, what Bella and Theo did gain – as well as the night
terrors – was far more important than money: newfound appreciation for
the exploitative language of corporate creativity!

“To ideate is to have ideas – and think them too.”

Bella and Theo IDEATE! is a set of propositions to artists: ideas for
form, ideas for content, ideas for place.… Continue

Calendar

Alex Laurie: Calendar
// Opening Thursday 25th May 2017, 6pm 
// 28 May – 17 June 2017

An exhibition by Alex Laurie with text by Evangeline Riddiford Graham.… Continue

Ayesha Green

2. The Spirit of the Thing Given (Māori)
// Opening Wednesday 26th April 2017, 6pm 
// 27 April – 20 May 2017

Makereti born in 1872, also known as Guide Maggie, Margaret Thom, Margaret Dennan, Maggie Papakura, and Margaret Staples-Brown, was one of three children of Pia Ngarotu Te Rihi, of Tūhourangi and Ngāti Wāhiao, and William Arthur Thom, an Englishman and former soldier from the colonial militiai (Werry 2011:51).

She was raised by Māori relatives in Whakarewarewa and the nearby village of Parekārangi, spending time at the village school in Ōhinemutu. As a young teenager she spent three years at Hukarere College, a state school for Māori girls that offered academic curriculum and training in domestic duties, preparing students for the gendered work of racial uplift prescribed by Māori reform movements of the era and for the assimilation to European custom favored by mission and state bodies (ibid).Continue